Tag Archives: Joel Plaskett

O Canada

Not too long ago, a close friend of mine became a Canadian citizen. Today we celebrated that fact. I told her and her husband that I would provide the music for the party…

 

  1. Blue In Yr Eye – Amy Millan
  2. Snowbird – Anne Murray
  3. Neighborhood #1 (Tunnels) – The Arcade Fire
  4. The Power – Army Girls
  5. Sleepy Maggie – Ashley MacIsaac
  6. Tall Tall Shadow – Basia Bulat
  7. Two Girls From Montreal – The Bicycle
  8. Somebody Waits – Blue Rodeo
  9. Hasn’t Hit Me Yet – Blue Rodeo
  10. Anthems For A Seventeen Year Old Girl – Broken Social Scene
  11. Lovers In A Dangerous Time – Bruce Cockburn
  12. Pop Goes the World – The Burning Hell
  13. Golden Baby – Cœur de pirate
  14. Claire – Cuff The Duke
  15. Sold – Dan Mangan
  16. The Valley Town – Elliott Brood
  17. Assoholic – 54-40
  18. Highschool – The Flashing Lights
  19. It’s Not Safe – Gentleman Reg
  20. Outside Of Saskatoon – The Good Family
  21. Song For A Winter’s Night – Gordon Lightfoot
  22. Straight Up the Dial – Hooded Fang
  23. You Will Know – The Inbreds
  24. True Patriot Love – The Joel Plaskett Emergency
  25. A Case Of You – Joni Mitchell
  26. Raised On Robbery – Joni Mitchell
  27. I Woke Myself Up – Julie Doiron
  28. Crabbuckit – k-os
  29. If Rap Gets Jealous – K’naan
  30. Back to Me – Kathleen Edwards
  31. Never Had To Fight – Local Rabbits
  32. Let Your Backbone Slide – Maestro Fresh Wes
  33. Fil de soie – Marie-Pierre Arthur
  34. Echo Beach – Martha And The Muffins
  35. Cocaine Cowgirl – Matt Mays & El Torpedo
  36. Ages & Stages – The Meligrove Band
  37. Rockin’ In The Free World – Neil Young
  38. Pocahontas – Neil Young & Crazy Horse
  39. Mass Romantic – The New Pornographers
  40. Someone Who’s Cool – Odds
  41. Joy of Cooking – Old Man Luedecke
  42. Smells Like Teen Spirit – Paul Anka
  43. Scott Pilgrim – Plumtree
  44. 9 Piece Luggage Set – Radio Radio
  45. April Fools – Rufus Wainwright
  46. Edmonton – The Rural Alberta Advantage
  47. North Humberland West – The Sadies
  48. Possession – Sarah McLachlan
  49. Money City Maniacs – Sloan
  50. Everything You’ve Done Wrong – Sloan
  51. Underwhelmed – Sloan
  52. Home For A Rest – Spirit Of The West
  53. Northwest Passage – Stan Rogers
  54. Up And Running – The Super Friendz
  55. The Day We Hit The Coast – Thrush Hermit
  56. Life Is A Highway – Tom Cochrane
  57. Raise a Little Hell – Trooper
  58. D.D. – The Weeknd Trilogy
  59. Common People – William Shatner
  60. I Wasn’t Made For Fighting – Woodhands

Recollection Volume 1 – Down At The Khyber

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly.

Album: Down At The Khyber
Artist: The Joel Plaskett Emergency
Released: 2001
Format(s) I own it on: CD/Vinyl

The Joel Plaskett Emergency - Down At The KhyberThe Joel Plaskett Emergency’s Down At The Khyber is the perfect choice to start this project. The album was chosen randomly, but Plaskett was the first artist I ever interviewed1

Pictured to the left is the album’s vinyl release. When I interviewed Plaskett I had him sign my copy; it sits framed in my living room.

Plaskett had, throughout his years with Thrush Hermit, traveled from coast to coast. Down At The Khyber is a record about a life on the road. From the title track where his true love will never betray him, even if he’s on the road, to singing about his popularity soaring while on the road to Saskatchewan, to driving across the country by the “Light of the Moon.” Plaskett’s songs live in the geography of Canada; he practically bleeds maple syrup.

The Joel Plaskett Emergency were Joel Plaskett, Tim Brennan, and Dave Marsh.

Highlights

The title track is about meeting his love at Halifax’s storied Khyber Club. It’s a tale of love and trust. It’s also a killer rock and roll song.

“Blinding Light” is a beautiful country duet with the then-Guthrie Ruth Minnikin. Any time Minnikin sings is a pleasure and Plaskett puts in his best vocal performance of the album.

Plaskett apparently likes to drift off to the CBC and found that the 3AM sign off was too early. “True Patriot Love” is a rock and roll anthem about the CBC’s sign off.

The album finishes with “Light of the Moon,” a beautiful acoustic song about traveling from Canada’s west to the east. It’s hauntingly beautiful and ends the record with a ruckus deserving of this album.

Lowlights

This album is pretty damn solid, but I often take a pass at “This Is A Message” and “Unconditional Love.” Not Plaskett’s best songs, but still good.

Men 1 (100%) | Women 0 (0%)
Canada 1 (100%)
Ontario0 (0%) | Quebec0 (0%) | Nova Scotia1 (100%) | New Brunswick0 (0%) | Manitoba0 (0%) | British Columbia0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island0 (0%) | Saskatchewan0 (0%) | Alberta0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador0 (0%)
Northwest Territories0 (0%) | Yukon0 (0%) | Nunavut0 (0%)
  1. For Being There Magazine. Click here for the article. []

TURF Video

I shot a lot of video during Toronto Urban Roots Festival… here you go, internets.

TURF Day 1

The Barr Brothers:

The Barr Brothers

Your name confuses me. Remember The Barmitzvah Brothers? I do! I thought you were them. You are not. You were okay though. I enjoyed your set. It was a nice lazy set to open the festival with. You were enjoyable… bravo.

The Barr Brothers

Camera Obscura:

Camera Obscura

You want to be Belle & Sebastian. All these years later, you still want to be Belle & Sebastian. You’re not Belle & Sebastian… BUT BELLE & SEBASTIAN WILL BE AT TURF LATER IN THE WEEK! OMG! OMG! OMG! You’re pleasant. You write nice songs. They’re not great, but they’re fun. Your bass player has a TARDIS sticker on his bass. I approve of that. Sadly you didn’t play your best song, “Suspended From Class.”

Camera Obscura

The Joel Plaskett Emergency:

Joel Plaskett Emergency

What can I say about Plaskett? I’ve seen him a few hundred times already. He’s an entertainer, he knows how to put on a good show. Sure I might not really dig Scrappy Happiness, but the set overall was a lot of fun. My only comment would be that I took out my ear plugs three times during your set thinking that the set was over, but then you started tuning you guitar… Why am I writing it to Joel, he’s not going to read this… Well, hi Joel. Long time no talk. Ran into your friend Peter a few weeks back at NXNE. You should tell him to grow his beard back. Beard.

Joel Plaskett Emergency

She & Him:

First off, why no photo pit She & Him? Also why no letting the VIP guests (WHO PAID A SHITLOAD EXTRA) into the VIP area?!?! That’s not nice, She & Him. Your songs can be best described as Zooey’s character on The New Girl; pretty, sweet, vapid. I did enjoy lying out on the grass with my eyes closed listening your music. Until you covered “You’ve Really Got A Hold On Me.” Ugh! NO ONE CAN COVER THAT SONG… Unless you’re THE BEATLES! Are you the Beatles? Didn’t think so.

Joel Plaskett Emergency at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre

Recently Canadian heartthrob and rock balladeer Joel Plaskett committed himself to recording and delivering a song a week. He would go into the studio, record a song, mix and master it, and then send it off to the CBC where it would premiere the next day, and then be available for purchase on iTunes. This is Scrappy Happiness the latest Joel Plaskett Emergency record.

For those unaware, The Joel Plaskett Emergency is Chris Pennell, Dave Marsh, and of course, Joel Plaskett. Plaskett has released seven albums since 1999 and penned some truly classic Canadian songs.

  • In Need of Medical Attention, Joel Plaskett (1999)
  • Down At The Khyber, The Joel Plaskett Emergency (2001)
  • Truthfully Truthfully, The Joel Plaskett Emergency (2003)
  • La De Da, Joel Plaskett (2005)
  • Ashtray Rock, The Joel Plaskett Emergency (2007)
  • Three, Joel Plaskett (2009)
  • Scrappy Happiness, The Joel Plaskett Emergency (2012)

What is exactly the difference between a Joel Plaskett album and a Joel Plaskett Emergency album is unknown to even the most devout, but Plaskett has made a niche for himself with his blend of country, east coast folk, and rock. Whether he’s rocking heavy, or playing with an acoustic guitar his sound is his own and easily recognizable.

On Saturday night I asked a friend where her sisters were, and she replied that they’re “kinda over Plaskett as all his records sound alike.” It was that exact same sentimentality which had another interested in going. She hadn’t seen Plaskett since 2005, and hadn’t heard any of his material since then, yet she felt comfortable going to the concert, as she knew what to expect.

A bit of harsh criticism, but hardly inaccurate.

As the tracks of Scrappy Happiness were released on CBC, I can’t deny that I wasn’t thrilled with the new material. I was also slightly disappointed that a musician as Canadian as Plaskett didn’t rhyme Hüsker Dü with canoe. However, a friend pointed out:

Cut him some slack, this is the guy that rhymed “It’s catchin’ on” with “Saskatchewan.”

However, his material is always good, and he’s a great entertainer, so without hesitation I purchased tickets to both shows at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre. For those unaware, the QE is located on the Exhibition grounds near the Lake. It’s a large seated venue where I had previously seen both Dan Mangan and The Magnetic Fields (not the same bill). I didn’t know if it was general admission like Mangan or assigned seating like The Magnetic Fields. Turns out it was assigned seating, and I had the same seats for both shows (well, one apart). I was right on the side, but only about 10 row back.

Opening the show was Frank Turner, a bloke with a guitar. It’s hard for someone with simply a guitar to capture the attention of a large audience, especially an audience there to see another musician, but Turner was able to do that. He had the entire audience singing, and had me so well entertained that I bought his latest album.

Plaskett is another artist who’s good at entertaining a large audience with just an acoustic guitar, but he started his sets with the full Emergency band.

The show mostly consisted of songs from the new record, he however threw in a good chunk of songs from Three, but obviously not the complete triple record. Then he rounded out much of the shows with various songs from his other albums. He barely modified the content of the two shows, however, and it seemed a tad silly to attend both.

He played well, the band was tight, but Plaskett seemed to go on too many long and boring tangents mid-song. I should clarify that they were rehearsed tangents. They weren’t that enjoyable, and they turned “Work Out Fine” from a 3 minute pop masterpiece to a 10 minute wandering wreck.

When he was on form, he was fantastic; such as when he performed his old Thrush Hermit song “Before You Leave” on Saturday night. Other highlights include “Face of the Earth,” “Natural Disaster,” “A Million Dollars,” and “Through and Through and Through.”

Favourite posts of 2010

I thought I’d go through my year, and see my favourite posts from 2010. This is not a list of my favourite concerts, albums, etc, but rather my favourite posts.

Film

Food

  • POUTINE!
  • My first brunch experience at the Old Nick… I now go there weekly… at least.

Literature

  • A personal tale about knowing an author, Stacey Fowles, and then reading her novel. I would then embarrass myself by not recognizing her in a future meeting.
  • Reading about Canada & Mr. Diefenbaker.

Music

  • Questions about where the groove might actually be.
  • Dan Mangan performed at Trinity St. Paul’s.

Photography

  • This photo is my lock-screen photo on my iPhone.
  • Some of my best portrait shots are of Allegra.
  • I had fun taking photos of Natalia.
  • While the subject might not have been too fond of these pictures, I think they’re quite good. Sure, the subject is ugly1, but that doesn’t matter much.

Politics

Autre

Best insights into humanity, as written by me

  • “If you see a penis, it’s a comedy; if you see a vagina, it’s a drama. It explains why women laugh when I remove my pants.”
  • “Either I’m becoming a normal human being, or I have liver failure.”
  • “Her prose are compelling, straight to the point, and beautiful in their nude honesty.”4
  1. I know she’s not really ugly, but our friendship is based on mutual hatred. []
  2. Actually, I also proposed to Aviva. 2011 is sure going to be busy. []
  3. “Alone in a corner, surrounded by candy.” []
  4. Proud of that one, because of how true it is. []

Above the Earth, we receive the news; we are being (we are being) we are being reduced.

Night two of Hermit!

Noosed and Haloed Swear Words

There once was a rock and roll band who called themselves Nabisco Fonzie Thrush Hermit. These four young lads, Joel Plaskett, Rob Benvie, Ian McGettigan & Cliff Gibb traveled across Canada to promote their record Clayton Park1. They had a show at The Opera House in Toronto with The Flashing Lights and Local Rabbits; a bill which can only be described as perfection. I had a ticket to this show, it would be my first time seeing Thrush Hermit live. Hermit front-man, Joel Plaskett was sick. Bugger. At least the show with The Flashing Lights and Local Rabbits was more than enough rock and roll for anyone.

Thrush Hermit announced new dates to makeup for the missed tour, and unfortunately it was on a date I couldn’t attend. Thrush Hermit broke up.

Since then, I’ve seen Joel Plaskett, The Joel Plaskett Emergency2, Tigre Benvie3, and Camouflage Nights4 too many times to count.

Thrush Hermit are not the greatest band in the world. They were hokey and immature and sometimes downright horrible.

There were always highlights to their work, but a lot of lowlights, too. The band seemed stuck in the grunge sound of the early nineties, a sound that had previously pushed their compatriots Sloan to the foreground of Can-rock. The grunge sound on their records seemed more and more out of place as the nineties progressed. They did slowly evolve out of it, and move into a mesh of grunge and pop on their record Sweet Homewrecker. And while you can see a definite improvement in the band on this record, it wasn’t until 1999 when Thrush Hermit released their final album, Clayton Park that they had a record that was a complete departure from anything they had done before, and a complete masterpiece.

Clayton Park is a balls-out rock and roll extravaganza. Yes, there’s a large supply of guitar-wankery, and one must be in the right mood for that form of wanking, however, all 11 songs on the album are damn good! The second half of the album, however is where the band truly shines. It’s all Plaskett, but they create something which is so very unique to the band and their future solo output.

Let’s all get down to songs for the gang.

Friday, Saturday and Sunday, the Hermits are playing in Toronto. Last night they played at the Starlight Ballroom in Waterloo, and you can watch that show below, I haven’t watched it yet, as I’m seeing them in person on Friday.

  1. Not to be confused with Clanton Park, in Bathurst Manor. []
  2. With and without Ian McGettigan. []
  3. Rob Benvie’s temporary solo act. []
  4. A band featuring Benvie and McGettigan. []

Linky Link

  • Happy Family Day!
  • CityTV has an article on Eric Warner of We Are Busy Bodies. (via Jen Polk, via The Meligrove Band)
  • Mechanical Forest Sound records the highlight of last night’s Wavelength 500… Barcelona Pavilion.
  • Steregum reviews The Magnetic Fields at BAM.
  • Jian Ghomeshi (did I spell that right?) got a lot of flack last night, and though I’m not a fan, he does put some good musicians on his show. See below…

Top 50 of the Aughts further explained

A list is a list, and it doesn’t really cover what I hope to let people know. If you don’t know me, you won’t know why I chose these records. I thought I’d further explain the top 10.


10) God Help The Girl – God Help The Girl (2009)

God Help The Girl is the soundtrack to Stuart Murdoch’s unwritten film. The Belle & Sebastian frontman used the opportunity of a hiatus to record a new record using female vocalists who he wouldn’t usually have the opportunity to work within the stricter environment of a Belle & Sebastian album.

The songs are damn good, and Stuart arranges for a wide array of female vocalists who bring a new light to his songwriting. Though it’s not a Belle & Sebastian album, every member of the band does contribute to the record.

Highlight: “I’ll Have to Dance With Cassie,” is fuckin’ awesome. I love that song. Wholeheartedly.
Lowlight: Someone other than Stuart Murdoch singing “Funny Little Frog” is a tad weird.  It’s good, just weird.

Photo Credit: Beth Hamill (This woman deserves a medal for her photography)

Linky link: MySpace


9) Valery Gore – Avalanche To Wandering Bear (2008)

Much like the woman herself, Valery Gore’s music is beautiful and intelligent. Her lyrics are quirky and fun, while being layered, complete stories. On Avalanche To Wandering Bear, Gore grew as a songwriter, and took advantage of a bigger band. Adding a horn section seemed to add wonders. While her first record can easily be described as “a girl and her piano,” with a band that seemed to be superfluous. On Avalanche, the band seems to work as a more cohesive unit, better able to expand on Gore’s vision, bringing R&B, Jazz and Pop elements.

Highlight: “Without the beautifully worried head, there’d just be a bleeding neck.”
Lowlight: While I love the song “Red Eye Family,” it sounds like it belongs on her self-titled album and seems out of place here. One of the reasons I love it is that it reminds me of “Big Sky” by the Kinks.

Photo Credit: Me.

Linky link: Webpage | MySpace | Tune In Your Aerial: Adam Interviews Valery


8) Neil Young – Live At Massey Hall 1971 (2007)

I don’t generally like live albums but I did always have a favourite; it was 4 Way Street by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. This live disc from shortly after CSNY’s Déjà Vu was filled with beautiful acoustic renditions of some of their best songs, and Neil Young was in top form. Around the same time as that live album was recorded, Young did a solo tour with a brief stop in Toronto at the legendary theatre, Massey Hall. Live At Massey Hall 1971 captures this brilliant performance.

The songs aren’t all familiar, and very few were familiar to the audience, but most of them are classics. Young’s in top form during this performance, and Massey Hall is the best concert venue in the city.

Highlight: Fuck man! “Journey Through The Past.” Hands down.
Lowlight: Neil isn’t the greatest at between-song banter.

Photo Credit: The album cover.

Linky link: MySpace


7) Julie Doiron – Woke Myself Up (2007)

This album found me at just the right time. A divorce album, as I was going through a divorce… hooray! Well it might not have related to my specific situation, I still found great comfort in it. This might not be a brilliant record, but being a personal list, I cannot tell you how important this album was to me.

Highlight: “Don’t Wanna Be / Liked By You”
Lowlight: I could never get into “Yer Kids…” except live.

Photo Credit: Me. I <3 Julie.

Linky link: MySpace | Webpage


6) The Joel Plaskett Emergency – Down At The Khyber (2001)

In late September, I drove across the Prairie, the mountains behind me and the radio on.

Joel Plaskett’s first record with the Emergency band, after the totally ignored, but brilliant In Need of Medical Attention. The previous album was released silently while Plaskett was still touring with Thrush Hermit, and didn’t receive much if any press, as it was overshadowed by the Zepplinesque brilliant of Thrush Hermit’s Clayton ParkDown at the Khyber was his first release since the split of Thrush Hermit, and though it returned Plaskett to the heavier sound found on Clayton Park, he couldn’t shake the country that was added to his sound on Medical Attention.

“True Patriot Love” is perhaps the most iconic of the songs, but “Light of the Moon” and “Blinding Light” are serene beauties, perfection in a nutshell.

I don’t really know what to say about this record, it’s a fantastic record. I don’t know if it’s so good because of a personal history, or if it’s just a really good record. The fact that Plaskett didn’t become “famous” until long after this record was released makes me think it’s a personal thing, but I love it.

Highlight: Ruth Minnikin and Joel Plaskett duetting on “Blinding Light.”
Lowlight: “Maybe We Should Just Go Home.”

Photo Credit: Me. Taken at the Down At The Khyber night at the Horseshoe Tavern in Toronto.

Linky link: Webpage | MySpace | In Need of Radio’s Attention: Adam Interviews Joel


5) Neko Case & Her Boyfriends – Furnace Room Lullaby (2000)

It was 2000, so it was either OAC year or the year afterwards. I cannot remember. I bought two records at Sam The Record Man, A Taste of Complete Perspective by Elevator and Furnace Room Lullaby. Though I love both records with a passion, Furnace Room became on of my favourite records. Neko Case’s amazing voice is enthralling, and sublime. Case, a Yankee, enlisted a who’s who of CanRock “legends” to join her in writing and recording this record, from The Local Rabbits to The Sadies, Ron Sexsmith to Don Kerr and many more.

Furnace Room Lullaby is among my first dips into modern country music. Though I was already a fan of The Byrds and the Flying Burrito Brothers, my knowledge of modern country music was limited to Being There-era Wilco and Beck’s indulgences in country. While the others took their country with a heavy side of rock, Case was unashamedly in love with twang. The songs are strong and supported by incredible musicians, and finally Case’s beautiful voice makes them perfection.

I can never get enough of listening to this record.

Highlight: “We’ve Never Met.” If my copy of the CD weren’t three whole metres away, I might get up to check to see who it is who is duetting with Case, but it doesn’t matter. Their voices are perfect together, and the song written by Case, Ron Sexsmith and Don Kerr is a perfect showcase.
Lowlight: “Thrice All American” is a great song, but I think it’s the weakest on the record. I wanted to say “‘Thrice All American’ because we want to pretend Neko is a Canuk,” but the truth is, it’s the weakest song on the record.

Photo Credit: Beth Hamill. Beth took this photo at The Rivoli in Toronto, where Neko was premiering Fox Confessor Brings The Flood to Toronto. An incredible show, and Beth’s first Neko show.

Linky link: Webpage | MySpace


4) The Flashing Lights – Sweet Release (2001)

We’re known in the Valley and big back in Hali, we’re the kings of the Canadian now.

Sweet Release is hands down the worst album by The Flashing Lights, and yet it’s in my top four albums of an entire decade. Makes me wonder where Where The Change Is would’ve ranked on this list if it was released a year later.

Matt Murphy’s Flashing Lights were perhaps one of the best shows in Canada. When the Flashing Lights hit the stage, you knew you were in for a good time. Draped in ’70s garb, destroying tambourines, while guitarists went flying from bass drums. Their live show wouldn’t have been anything special without the music, and Matt Murphy has proven time and time again to be a master at creating some of the best pop music of our time. Whether is the Super Friendz’ “Karate Man,” or The Flashing Lights’ “Friends You Learn To Hate.”

Highlight: The first two songs of the album set this record off on a note it never catches back up to.
Lowlight: “It’s Alright.” Never got into that one too much.

Photo Credit: Me! I took this photo during the Guy Terrifico DVD release show. Sure it’s not the Flashing Lights, but I wasn’t taking photos of bands when they existed.

Linky link: CBC Radio 3 | Hump The Drum: Adam Interviews Murphy


3) Belle & Sebastian – Dear Catastrophe Waitress (2003)

Belle & Sebastian’s output this decade has been subpar, however par for Belle & Sebastian is perhaps the best of any band since The Beatles. Okay, so that’s a highly personalized opinion, but Tigermilk and If You’re Feeling Sinister are among my favourite records of all time. Dear Catastrophe Waitress is not really by the same band, while the first two records were a singular vision of Stuart Murdoch’s, all subsequent albums were a collective creation by Belle & Sebastian as a whole. Yes, Murdoch is the the primary singer-songwriter of the band, but it’s still a creation of the whole band.

Dear Catastrophe Waitress has some of the band’s best material, nothing as staggeringly great as “The State I Am In” or “Judy And The Dream Of Horses” or a sugary sweet as “Sukie In The Graveyard” or “The Blues Are Still Blue,” but it does have some of their best material. “Wrapped Up In Books,” “Lord Anthony,” “Piazza, New York Catcher,” etc. etc.

One thing I find odd. Why do I love this record so much? There’s so much religion involved in the record, and I’m not the biggest fan of religion. 

I’ll forever be indebted to a woman named Teri who I haven’t spoken to in over a decade. She introduced me to Belle & Sebastian by sending me a cassette with If You’re Feeling Sinister on it.

Highlight: “I’m A Cuckoo”
Lowlight: “Roy Walker,” I think it’s time for Stevie to give it up.

Photo Credit: Beth Hamill, once again.

Linky link: Webpage | MySpace


2) The Magnetic Fields – i (2004)

If Howard Jones can be God Help The Girl’s Mozart, then Stephin Merritt can be mine. Stephin Merritt is the frontman of The Magnetic Fields, a band who’s music is as vast as it is acute. While Merritt seems to attempt to cover every genre imaginable, when hearing a Magnetic Fields recording, you know it’s The Magnetic Fields.

I think i is the album I return to the most frequently. I don’t know if it’s their best, it probably isn’t, but there’s something I love about this album. It might be the ridiculous theme (all the songs begin with the letter i), maybe it’s the stupid/hilarious/smart/smirk-worthy lyrics such as “so you’re brilliant, gorgeous, and ampersand after ampersand” or “I don’t die, I say ‘hi,’ how clever. I turn blue, I love you forever. I’m tongue-tied and useless.”

I can easily and have been lost in Merritt’s naratives, and wondered if he was singing about me in “I Looked All Over Town” or “I’m Tongue-Tied.”

Highlight: “It’s Only Time” is perhaps one of the most beautiful and romantic songs ever written.
Lowlight: “I Was Born,” I usually skip this track.

Photo Credit: Some dude. I dunno. It’s not my photo.

Linky link: Webpage | MySpace


1) Sleater-Kinney – The Woods (2005)

My lord, what can I say about this album? It’s bloody perfect!

Angry, bold, strong, melodic, bassless, ear-shattering, adjectives!

Simply just listen to this, it’ll cost you less than $20 to buy it, it’s worth it. Hell, you can even borrow it from the Toronto Public Library.

Perfection.

Highlight: “Jumpers”
Lowlight: You have to be in a rather specific mood to listen to so much guitar-wankery.

Photo Credit: Someone took this.

Linky link: Webpage | MySpace