Tag Archives: Liz Shaw

Doctor Who Serial 129 – The Five Doctors

Doctor Who loves that “One day, I shall come back” clip.

Richard Hurndall doesn’t look much like William Hartnell.

“Just a twinge of ‘Cosmic Angst.'” That’s my band name. Cosmic Angst. The nerdy teenagers will love it!

God damn, just 30 seconds with Patrick Troughton makes me happy. He’s so good. Best Doctor.

The Brigadier says that someone is his replacement and Troughton replies, “yes, mine was pretty unpromising, too.” Now I have no idea how he knows that as a character, but damn, I love that line, so much.

Jon Pertwee’s abduction wasn’t as great as I would have wanted.

Sarah Jane has a greater part to play in abduction scenes than Jon Pertwee.

And here’s Tom Baker’s archive footage. A shame he wouldn’t participate. I would have loved to see him with Patrick Troughton.

I don’t like this trend of Companions knowing how to use the TARDIS.

Yay! The Master! Time for some moustache twirling!

Hmm, this is the first appearance of the Dalek’s since Tom Baker left.

“Teeth and curls?” Classic!

Peter Davison making excuses to his previous self is great.

It’s nice that they have well maintained paved roads in the Death Zone.

The Commodore 64 graphics in the TARDIS are excellent.

“The scanner is keyed to my, to our, brainwave pattern. Well, well, well, so two of them made it. I wonder what happened to the other.” This is written in William Hartnell’s Doctor voice, and Hurndall fails to master it in any way.

Susan twisting her ankle is probably the best moment in this entire story.

God, I love Gallifreyan fashion.

Susan acts exactly like she did in the good ole’ days.

Cops are bastards on Earth and on Gallifrey.

Patrick Troughton’s cowardess is one of my favourite things of the second doctor era.

Yeah, make Sara Jane carry everything, Doctor.

I love Zoe and Jamie. I miss that trio.

“What happened to the little fellow?”

“I’ve reversed the polarity of the neutron flow.” Thank you Jon Pertwee!

What a romp!

Doctor Who Serial 054 – Inferno

Synopsis: The Doctor is consulting on a massive drilling project allowing him to syphon off energy to use on his TARDIS console. People start dying.

vlcsnap-2014-04-06-08h47m45s83So apparently The Doctor is keeping the TARDIS console in a garage, and using a sonic screwdriver as a garage door opener. Meanwhile, once again we have a science project happening where the lead is an arrogant asshole who won’t listen to reason or take responsible safety precautions. While Sir Keith, the funder is trying to bring in consultants to ensure safety and responsibility. Showing its British class-structure.

The Doctor flies the TARDIS console into a parallel universe, where an evil Brigade Leader Lethbridge-Stewart is leading a scientific team for the Republican Security Force. It must be evil if Queen Lizzy is deposed.

The Doctor is captured by Lethbridge-Stewart, and ends up fighting for his freedom, while also observing the parallel universe’s drilling having the same problems that he will have on Earth Prime.

vlcsnap-2014-04-06-15h23m49s181This is the first seven-parter that doesn’t feel like it drags… too much. It seems to work. This was the end of season 7. Instead of the usual 40-odd episodes, the seasons now have only 20-odd episodes. It’s a lot less Doctor Who, but it’s a lot more manageable. Troughton and Hartnell never had it so easy.

This theme of scientists who are too caught up on their own grandeur to see what they’re doing is played out. For some odd reason this, and a distaste of computers are a recurring theme in Doctor Who and sci-fi in general. It’s riduculous beyond belief.

Jon Pertwee attempts to become an action star in his role as The Doctor. He does a lot of martial arts, car chases, and just a lot of jumping around. It’s an interesting take on The Doctor, something that 50 years later is still unique to Pertwee.

Doctor Who Serial 051 – Spearhead From Space

Synopsis: The Doctor, having just regenerated, finds himself on exiled on Earth helping UNIT. Strange objects have fallen from the sky, as a forerunner for the Nestines to conquer Earth.

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Hello Jon Pertwee.

Though most of episode one has The Doctor unconscious, we quickly get a good idea of who The Doctor is now. He’s tricky, he’s clever, and he loves a bit of action.

We get reintroduced to UNIT who are investigating falling meteorite, they also find the unconscious Doctor along with the TARDIS. This gets Brigadier General Lethbridge-Stewart excited, thinking The Doctor has returned. He finds out about this while interviewing a young woman named Liz Shaw, so he brings her with.

Sadly, the man in the hospital bed does not look like The Doctor, but he recognizes Lethbridge-Stewart.

We learn The Doctor has two hearts for the first time.

The Doctor gets kidnapped by some strangers, but quickly breaks free, and tries to get to the TARDIS, only to be shot by the UNIT guards.

They take The Doctor back to the hospital where the physician says, “He’s more unconscious than anyone I’ve ever seen!” Which is the most amazing line of dialogue, ever.

In an excellent scene, The Doctor hides from the hospitals doctors in the staff room then steals clothing from them. This scene will be riffed upon in “The Eleventh Hour.”

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The production quality is vastly different than the previous seasons. They reduced the number of episodes from forty-something to a more manageable twenty-something. This serial, is a bit unique in that it was completely filmed on location on film. Usually Doctor Who has a few scenes filmed on location on 16mm, and the rest is video taped in studio. This makes for a very drastic change in Doctor Who.

The mystery of the fallen spheres takes a back seat to reintroducing The Doctor, Lethbridge-Stewart, and introducing Liz Shaw.

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Creepy dude is creepy.

Episode four seems to finally get into the plot, where the plastics company is making models for Madame Tussaud’s, oddly though of top civil servants, not of famous people.

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Perhaps what make Jon Pertwee so great of a Doctor is the elasticity of his face. He’s able to bring a great level of comedy to Doctor Who.

The comparisons to “Rose” are really easy. Both Spearhead From Space and “Rose” are the start of a new era of Doctor Who. Both feature the same baddies and have shop window dummies go on a killing spree. In both stories we have to learn to love a new Doctor. I think in some ways “Rose” is better, and in other Spearhead From Space is better.

I don’t know if there’s a lot of comparison between Christopher Eccelston’s version of The Doctor and Jon Pertwee’s. Eccelston plays a damaged man who is looking for a bit of fun. Pertwee is trying to remember who he is, and hoping to run away.

In the end, these are two great Doctor Who stories.