Tag Archives: Recollection

Recollection Volume 22 – Choose Love

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses…

Album: Choose Love
Artist: Ringo Starr
Released: 2005
Format(s) I own it on: CD

RingoStarrChooseLoveCDCoverPeace and love. Peace and love. This is the second time Computron has chosen a Ringo Starr record, and neither of them are one of his good records.

I don’t know if I ever listened to this record. It was given to me by Cari and Adam when they received it for Being There. I do know that when I went to find it on my computer, it wasn’t there. Also, I should say that I own a few Ringo records… some of which I actually enjoy, but unlike how the current trend might imply, Ringo does not occupy 9% of my record collection.

Listening to this record, it’s hard to believe that this is an album made by a former-Beatle. This album is almost a parody of the Ringo-sound, and I don’t think anyone would be surprised to hear that it’s not a great record.

Ringo has made good records. His album Ringo and Goodnight Vienna are perfect examples, as those records are filled with some of the best songwriters or his era; Harry Nilsson, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Elton John, George Harrison, Randy Newman, Allen Toussaint and more. Choose Love features the songwriting of Ringo Starr, Mark Hudson, and Gary Burr. Those two must be living a dream, working with a Beatle, but for a Beatle to work with those two, is disappointing to say the least.

Finally, can we talk about the cover? Who shot this? It’s a terrible photo. It looks like Ringo has six fingers. It looks like his thumb and pinky are touching (as they are, and then his remaining four fingers are doing the Vulcan salute.

Highlights

Umm…

Lowlights

“Give Me Back The Beat” is HORRIBLE. Oh my lord, Ringo!

What were you thinking when you wrote “Don’t Hang Up?” Did you not learn anything from hanging out with John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison?

Men 17.25 (78%) | Women 4.75 (22%)
Canada 6.8 (31%) | USA 10.53 (48%) | UK 4.66 (21%)
Ontario 3 (43%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (29%) | New Brunswick 1 (14%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%)
Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (14%) | Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)

Recollection Volume 21 – Boys For Pele

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses… 

Album: Boys For Pele
Artist: Tori Amos
Released: 1996
Format(s) I own it on: CD

Boys for PeleI haven’t listened to Tori Amos in a while. Once upon a time I lived with a woman obsessed with Ms. Amos. I never disliked her work, and I have been to a few shows, and quite enjoy some of her albums, but she can be very Tori Amos.

Boys For Pele is probably the album I listened to the most of hers. I think it is her strongest, but it’s also the first album of hers I was introduced to. I like to think this is THE classic Amos album, but I that might just be my perception.

Amos is a skilled songwriter, and at times really shows off her skill at melody and song structure on this album. Songs like “Doughnut Song,” “Professional Widow,” and “Hey Jupiter” really showcase her skills.

At the same time, other songs like “Not The Red Baron” show her willingness to experiment, but it doesn’t always work. Amos really excels in a traditional pop song structure, and when she deviates, something is lost.

While Amos has a strong voice, he vocal stylings can often be a tad over the top. I don’t think most people want to listen what sounds like her performing vocal exercises while receiving cunnilingus. “In The Springtime Of His Voodoo” is a perfect example of this, at times she layers her harmonized vocals masterfully, at other times it becomes a mess. I think, though, this is part of the admission into a Tori Amos record.

Another example of her “cunnilingus vocals” is “Professional Widow” which makes me excited for the next review. The artist of which also loves to sing about “peace and love” though he is less vocal about his love of a “hard cock.”1

Highlights

While we’re discussing that, we can look at how she perfectly harmonizes with herself. Listen to “Father Lucifer,” and I think you’ll agree with me.

Amos likes to showcase the harpsichord, and is one of the few musicians who can pull that instrument off. Her song “Blood Roses” is the perfect vessel for the instrument.

“Caught A Lite Sneeze” might have terrible spelling of the word “light,” but it’s a great song. It’s a fantastic example of Amos’s skill to layer harmonized vocals. It’s also a beautiful song.

Finally, “Mr. Zebra,” because, duh!

Lowlights

“Way Down” seems forced, and lucky that that it’s so short.

“Hey Jupiter” is at times a beautifully stunning song. Other times it just rambles and is a bit of a mess.2

Men 16.25 (77%) | Women 4.75 (23%)
Canada 6.8 (32%) | USA 10.53 (50%) | UK 3.66 (18%)
Ontario 3 (43%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (29%) | New Brunswick 1 (14%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%)
Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (14%) | Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)
  1. Ringo’s loss. []
  2. Only one person’s opinion, I may piss off a few hundred people, including my ex-wife, with this statement. Hi Lisa. []

Recollection Volume 20 – Avenue Road

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses… 

Album: Avenue Road
Artist: Kensington Market
Released: 1968
Format(s) I own it on: Vinyl

Avenue RoadThis is a strange album. Kensington Market, named after the famed market in Toronto, decided to name their debut record after a street nowhere near the Market they derive their name from. Avenue Road is also the strangest named street in Toronto. Is it an avenue or a road? Make up your mind, Toronto!

The album is a strange mixture of British Invasion-styled pop, rock and roll, medieval faire-fare, psychedelia, and schmaltz. It’s almost as if Graham Nash took a hit of acid, visited a medieval faire, started dancing around until he found a harpsichord1.

This album seems to be an endeavour to create a Canadian reaction to the British Invasion, but there’s so much missing. There’s no soul, there’s no grit, there’s no sense of style. The album also is a child of its time. While other ’60s bands, like The Beatles, were able to stand the test of time, listening to Kensington Market is almost a chore due to the dated and overly stylized production.

Highlights

“Beatrice” aaaah! This song isn’t great, but it’s worth a mention, because it’s silly and a bit ridiculous. It could almost be a song written by Charlie on It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia.

Lowlights

Sadly “Phoebe” is not a song about the character from Friends. Also sad is that it’s just a plainly boring song.

Men 16.25 (81%) | Women 3.75 (19%)
Canada 6.8 (34%) | USA 9.53 (48%) | UK 3.66 (18%)
Ontario 3 (43%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (29%) | New Brunswick 1 (14%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%)
Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (14%) | Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)
  1. There’s no harpsichord that I noticed on the record, but there should be. []

Recollection Volume 19 – Automatic For The People

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses… 

Album: Automatic For The People
Artist: R.E.M.
Released: 1992
Format(s) I own it on: CD

With the recent passing of Nash The Slash, I’m tempted to write about his album Dreams and Nightmares, but I promised myself this would be random. So for now, R.E.M. …

Automatic For The PeopleI was 10 when this album came out. It was always around throughout my life. The singles on this album were in heavy rotation on Toronto stations and Much Music. The videos for “Everybody Hurts” and “Man On The Moon” were always on television. That image of Michael Stipe wandering that freeway is permanently associated with the song.

It was only a year and a half earlier that Out of Time was released and R.E.M. entered my world. “Shiny Happy People” and “Losing My Religion” were documents of the era. A gentler transition from the prefabricated pop of the ’80s into the grunge and alternative of the ’90s was allowed through R.E.M., rather than the jarring burst of energy from Nirvana.

Though this record was always around me, I never bought it. My building has a book exchange. Someone once left a stack of CDs there, and I grabbed myself a free copy of Automatic For The People. It might have taken me forever to have a copy, but I feel I know it so well.

R.E.M. have an amazing skill at writing well-crafted addictive pop songs. Automatic For The People is amongst their most commercial release. They released six singles from the album, three of which did extremely well on Canadian charts, and the other three did well to great on other charts.

These songs stand the test of time, and are rooted in a tradition of great pop music with an easy line of sight to the mastery of Lennon-McCartney.

Highlights

“Everybody Hurts,” “Drive,” Nightswimming,” and “Man on the Moon.” Duh.

Lowlights

“New Orleans Instrumental No. 1” and “Sweetness Follows” is a bit of a dull spot on the album. They aren’t bad per se, but they don’t stand out like the rest.

Men 15.25 (80%) | Women 3.75 (20%)
Canada 5.8 (31%) | USA 9.53 (50%) | UK 3.66 (19%)
Ontario 2 (33%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (33%) | New Brunswick 1 (16%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%)
Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (16%) | Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)

 

 

Recollection Volume 18 – The Salvation Blues

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses… 

Album: The Salvation Blues
Artist: Mark Olson
Released: 2007
Format(s) I own it on: CD

The Salvation BluesMark Olson’s The Salvation Blues has stumped me. I haven’t written here for a while as life got busy, but also because I don’t know what to write abut this album.

This is the problem with a process that is decided by a random algorithm; I can’t move stuff around to accommodate me.

The Salvation Blues is not a bad record, and it’s not a great record, it’s a middling record. The former-Jayhawk has none of the beautiful harmonies he’s known for. His songs are hesitant and provide no opening for the listener to get into.

The album starts off very jagged. It feels as if the second “My Carol” begins, the first milliseconds of that first note are cut off. It’s jarring, and that feeling continues throughout the record.

Highlights

“National Express” is as catchy as the record gets, and it’s not that catchy. The chorus is repetitive enough to sing along with it, but… yeah.

Lowlights

As I said before it’s not good or bad. The album is just so middling it’s hard to have any opinion on it.

Men 14.25 (79%) | Women 3.75 (21%)
Canada 5.8 (32%) | USA 8.53 (47%) | UK 3.66 (20%)
Ontario 2 (33%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (33%) | New Brunswick 1 (16%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%)
Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (16%) | Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)

 

 

Recollection Volume 17 – BBC Sessions

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses… 

Album: BBC Sessions
Artist: The Who
Released: 2000
Format(s) I own it on: CD

BBC+Sessions+The+WhoThere was a trend in the ’90s and 2000s to release compilations of BBC Radio musical performances on CD. The Beatles had a huge success with Live At The BBC. The Kinks, Bowie, Hendrix, Fleetwood Mac, Led Zepplin, hell, even Loudon Wainwright III. This is The Who’s entry.

Where these compilations excel is hearing bands you know and love performing covers of early rock and roll and sometimes their contemporaries.

“Good Lovin'” and “Leaving Here” are amongst the best examples on this compilation. “Leaving Here” a cover of a Eddie Holland song. I didn’t know before that Holland of Holland-Dozier-Holland fame had a recording career.

We also get to hear live-off-the floor recordings of classic songs by these great bands. Hearing The Who perform a great version of “My Generation” has its appeal. However, I’d more often than not just rather listen to the original recordings. The sound quality of these recordings is very poor, leaving the listener wanting some power to the punch, which The Who should deliver, but fail to in these Sessions.

Highlights

“Boris The Spider” is the classic John Entwistle song delivered in his unique vocals.

“Substitute” is one of the best Who songs. Period.

“The Good’s Gone” is a strange mod song that The Who perform extremely well. They barely sound like themselves, but Keith Moon’s drumming keeps it in line enough with The Who’s style.

Lowlight

“Disguises.” My lord, this is painful.

Men 13.25 (78%) | Women 3.75 (22%)
Canada 5.8 (34%) | USA 7.53 (44%) | UK 3.66 (22%)
Ontario 2 (33%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (33%) | New Brunswick 1 (16%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%) | Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (16%)
Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)

 

 

Recollection Volume 16 – The Green Fields of Foreverland…

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses… 

Album: The Green Fields of Foreverland…
Artist: The Gentle Waves
Released: 1999
Format(s) I own it on: CD

0000894370_500The first solo album from Belle & Sebastians then-cellist. She eventually left the band in 2002, but for the mean time The Gentle Waves was a side project. The album was released on Belle & Sebastian’s then-label Jeepster, and featured nearly the entire band (Campbell, Stuart Murdoch, Stevie Jackson, Mick Cooke, Chris Geddes, and Richard Colburn) only missing was then-bassist Stuart David and violinist Sarah Martin.

Campbell’s voice is a whisper, it seems it’s often difficult for her to push the air out of her lungs as she sings. As she sings “I will change my mind” in “A Chapter In The Life Of Mathiew” you can hear her struggle to get that first “I” out. Near the end of the song, Murdoch’s vocals are doubled with Campbell’s, the two voices complimenting one another echoing what made Arab Strap-era Belle & Sebastian so good. It’s the only song on the entire album that feature vocals other than Campbell’s which I believe to be a mistake. Campbell’s voice is weak and has trouble carrying the 31 minute album. If there were other vocalists to allow for contrast, it would create a more enjoyable experience for the listener. As I type this I realize that I’m writing a thesis in support of her work with Mark Lanegan, but we have to wait for the 2000s and 2010s for that.

Highlights

“Weathershow,” duh. That rhythmic pounding guitar accentuated with handclaps. Stevie outdoes himself on guitar. This is probably the only song on the album that wouldn’t sound out of place on Belle & Sebastian’s The Boy With The Arab Strap, or a Velvet Underground album. I imagine that’s much of Jackson’s influence; something that Murdoch held him back from on “Judy And The Dream of Horses.”

“Evensong” is another of the album’s songs that feature a full band and even adds flute and trumpet. Campbell is really utilizing the band she’s around but also this time adding her style that might not meld so well with a Belle & Sebastian record.

The album’s opening track, “Hangman In The Shadow” sets us off on the adventure. It really successfully demonstrates what an Isobel Campbell record will sound like.

And “A Chapter In The Life Of Mathiew” as discussed above.

Lowlights

After three great songs, the album’s fourth is probably its weakest. “Emanuelle Skating On Thin Ice” is a plodding song featuring Isobel’s lacklustre piano playing.

Men 12.25 (77%) | Women 3.75 (23%)
Canada 5.8 (36%) | USA 7.53 (47%) | UK 2.66 (17%)
Ontario 2 (33%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (33%) | New Brunswick 1 (16%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%) | Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (16%)
Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)

 

 

Recollection Volume 15 – Summerteeth

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses… 

Album: Summerteeth
Artist: Wilco
Released: 1999
Format(s) I own it on: CD

Summerteeth-coverHow do I put this politely? This is not a happy record. I can’t say what Jeff Tweedy was going through when he wrote this album, all I can say is that it turned into some of the best music of the ’90s. This album cemented Wilco’s place as the kings of Americana.

The album might not be happy, but it surely is bold and strong. It’s arguably Wilco’s best. The melodies are fantastic, Tweedy’s lyrics are in top-form, even if a bit worrisome, and the band is solid.

The songs don’t stick to a singular style, but there’s a cohesion that runs throughout the record. They’ve abandoned the ultra-country sound of Being There and AM. Their followup Yankee Hotel Foxtrot won’t follow this style of pop-rock, so Summerteeth lives a life unlike any other Wilco album. 

Summerteeth is always a good record to put on.

Highlights

“She’s A Jar,” “I’m Always In Love,” and “Via Chicago” are amongst the best on the album.

Lowlights

The album is pretty solid through and through. “ELT” is probably one of the few songs that I feel just don’t work on the record.

Domestic Violence

We should talk about the elephant in the room, domestic violence. I don’t think I’m reading the wrong thing into this album.

I dreamed about killing you again last night
And it felt alright to me
Dying on the banks of Embarcadero skies
I sat and watched you bleed
Buried you alive in a fireworks display
Raining down on me
You cold, hot blood ran away from me
To the sea – “Via Chicago”

Umm…

She begs me not to hit her – “She’s A Jar”

Okay.

When I let go of your throat-sweet throttle. – “I’m Always In Love”

Tweedy, this isn’t really cool. Of course you’re allowed to write about whatever you please, it is your art, but jeezy creezy, this stuff is creepy.

If you wish to donate to the White Ribbon Campaign, click here. For more information, click here.

Men 12.25 (82%) | Women 2.75 (18%)
Canada 5.8 (39%) | USA 7.53 (50%) | UK 1.66 (11%)
Ontario 2 (33%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (33%) | New Brunswick 1 (16%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%) | Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (16%)
Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)

 

Recollection Volume 14 – Wanna Be Your Friend: A Tribute to the Inbreds

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses… 

Album: Wanna Be Your Friend: A Tribute to the Inbreds
Artist: Various Artists
Released: 2007
Format(s) I own it on: CD

wannabeyourfriend_inbredstribute_1000_1024x1024The Inbreds. I’m a big fan of The Inbreds, they didn’t always stick to their schtick of bass and drum, but even when they did, they succeeded in making interesting melodic pop that almost defies their instrumental limitations. That skill at crafting amazing melodies is what makes The Inbreds so spectacular.

Mike O’Neill and Dave Ulrich deserve every accolade they’ve received and more. If you don’t know their music, check out their records, they’re all inexpensive at zunior.com. While you’re at it, you might also want to check out Mike O’Neill’s three solo records. All those records will be reviewed in good time. Until then we have… Wanna Be Your Friend: A Tribute To The Inbreds. Yes, an Inbreds tribute album.

The artist selection is pretty impressive, a lot of bands I had never heard of, but there’s also The Just Barelys, The Superfantastics, Ruth Minnikin, members of Plumtree, Sloan, Super Friendz, and Eric’s Trip. It’s quite the lineup.

It’s not only the artist selection, but the song selection. It seems almost as if I had chosen the tracklist myself.

Highlights

I don’t know who Jonathan Inc. is or are, but I adore his/their cover of “Drag Us Down.”

The Forum, consisting of members of Sloan and The Super Friendz, perform a great version of “You Will Know” while Catriona Sturton does a great performance of “North Window.”

Interview

I asked Dave Ulrich, drummer from The Inbreds, and owner of Zunior.com on his thoughts on the album.

AA: What was your reaction when you first heard about the record? Did you have any input?

DU: I was pretty surprised because, although Gooseberry has gone on to do a whole series of tribute albums of that mid-90’s indie Canadian era, the Inbreds one was the first installment.  I didn’t have any input, but I believe Scott did tell me about it before it was finished.

AA: Is it cheating because Mike appears on the record (performing as part of Ruth Minnikin & Her Bandwagon)?

DU: At least we didn’t create a mock back to cover one of our songs.  I know Def Leppard used to have an opening act for their own shows that did cover songs, but the act was actually the band in disguise.  That kinda thing.

AA: Did any songs really stand out to you?

DU: Ruby Jean and the Thoughful Bees doing Amelia Earhart.  I think that one really got the spirit of where that song was coming from.

AA: Any song you wish was included, but wasn’t?

DU: I would have loved to hear a metal band doing Russ. It’s not too late everyone!!!

AA: There’s a band on the record calling themselves Alicia Penney & The Excellent Navigators, obviously a references to “Amelia Earhart.” Once upon a time was a band called Laura Peek And The Winning Hearts, a reference to The Inbreds album Winning Hearts. How do you feel these tributes play into the legacy of your work?

DU: Mike has spoken before about the way we, and all indie bands that we respected, were ‘humble’ in the 90’s.  You really had to be there to appreciate it.  I’m not sure there is an equivalent vibe today, although their are still many artists that sincerely come from a humble place, obviously.  It’s just that there was a unique version of it, I think, we were out there doing our thing. Anyways, I think that a big part of what Inbreds should/could be known for is how hard we worked recording/touring/releasing, consistently over time.  Combine that with an equal heavy effort from Mike on the songwriting side, and I that is why it worked as much as it did.  The effort was sincere.

AA: Are the covers that stay true to the original more entertaining to you, or the ones that take the songs in a new direction?

DU: I always like covers that go in a new direction.

Giant thanks to Dave Ulrich!

I’m filing this album as male, Canadian, and Ontarians, as that describes the band being paid tribute.

Men 11.25 (80%) | Women 2.75 (20%)
Canada 5.8 (41%) | USA 6.53 (47%) | UK 1.66 (12%)
Ontario 2 (33%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (33%) | New Brunswick 1 (16%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%) | Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (16%)
Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)

Recollection Volume 13 – The Tragic Treasury: Songs from A Series of Unfortunate Events

Recollection is a project to review my record collection. I will listen to an album I own and review it. The album will be chosen randomly by computron. Today computron chooses… 

Album: The Tragic Treasury: Songs from A Series of Unfortunate Events
Artist: The Gothic Archies
Released: 2006
Format(s) I own it on: CD

tragictreasury_largeWe are the Gothic Archies, death, tentacles, and pip.

Took longer than I expected to get to a Stephin Merritt project. The Gothic Archies is Merritt’s project of depressing bubblegum pop. The Tragic Treasury is a collection of songs created by The Gothic Archies for the young adult novels A Series of Unfortunate Events. Each audio book in the series began with a song by The Gothic Archies. 

Of the fifteen songs, thirteen were previously released on audio books. The other two include a song introducing the band aptly titled “We Are The Gothic Archies.” The other was an alternative song for one of the books.

You could count it as a comedic record if you want. I guess in many ways it is. While the lyrics are often humorous, it’s mostly just great music. Merritt is a master songwriter and it shows most when he has a theme, no matter how loose, to play with. Whether he’s writing 69 Love Songs, a record about the open road The Charm Of The Highway Strip,  Eternal Youth, or songs beginning with the letter i.

Highlights

The opening track “Scream And Run Away” is a perfect song about the book, but it’s actually a really fun and awesome song altogether. “Scream, scream, scream and run away. Run run run run run run run run or die die die die die die die die die die die.” These books are for children?

“Shipwrecked,” the song from the last book is probably my favourite. The tale of a man who purposely kills a boat’s crew to leave him and his love shipwrecked together… again.

Another favourite is “Walking My Gargoyle,” which tells the story of a monster who has a pet gargoyle. “Most people scream, most of the time, but always when I’m walking my gargoyle.”

Lowlights

“Dreary, Dreary” and “This Abyss” are amongst the tracks I would most regularly skip on this album. They’re a bit too slow and plodding.

Men 10.25 (79%) | Women 2.75 (21%)
Canada 4.8 (37%) | USA 6.53 (50%) | UK 1.66 (13%)
Ontario 1 (20%) | Quebec 0 (0%) | Nova Scotia2 (40%) | New Brunswick 1 (20%) | Manitoba 0 (0%) | British Columbia 0 (0%) | Prince Edward Island 0 (0%) | Saskatchewan 0 (0%) | Alberta 0 (0%) | Newfoundland and Labrador 1 (20%)
Northwest Territories 0 (0%) | Yukon 0 (0%) | Nunavut 0 (0%)